Maitake Mushroom

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What is it?

Maitake (Grifola frondose) is a type of mushroom. It forms large clumps on tree stumps and tree roots. It was first used in Asian traditional medicine.

Maitake mushroom grows in forests in Asia, Europe, and eastern North America. It contains chemicals that might help fight tumors, stimulate the immune system, and lower blood sugar levels.

People use maitake mushroom for enlarged ovaries with cysts, diabetes, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

It is effective?

Effective for …

There is interest in using maitake mushroom for a number of purposes, but there isn’t enough reliable information to say whether it might be helpful.

Is there concern for the safety of its use?
When taken by mouth: Maitake mushroom is possibly safe for most people. But there isn’t much information about potential side effects. Some people have reported nausea after taking maitake mushroom.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn’t enough reliable information to know if maitake mushroom is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Surgery: Maitake mushroom might affect blood sugar levels, making blood sugar control difficult during and after surgery. Stop using maitake mushroom at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Are there any drug interactions?

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Maitake mushroom might lower blood sugar levels. Taking maitake mushroom along with diabetes medications might cause blood sugar to drop too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely.

Medications for high blood pressure (Antihypertensive drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Maitake mushroom might lower blood pressure. Taking maitake mushroom along with medications that lower blood pressure might cause blood pressure to go too low. Monitor your blood pressure closely.

Warfarin (Coumadin)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Maitake mushroom might increase the blood thinning effects of warfarin and potentially increase the chance of bleeding. Your healthcare provider may need to monitor you more often if you take maitake mushroom along with warfarin. The dose of your warfarin medication may need to be changed.

Are there any interactions with herbs and supplements?
Herbs and supplements that might lower blood pressure: Maitake mushroom might lower blood pressure. Taking it with other supplements that have the same effect might cause blood pressure to drop too much. Examples of supplements with this effect include andrographis, casein peptides, L-arginine, niacin, and stinging nettle.
Herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar: Maitake mushroom might lower blood sugar. Taking it with other supplements with similar effects might lower blood sugar too much. Examples of supplements with this effect include aloe, bitter melon, cassia cinnamon, chromium, and prickly pear cactus.

Are there any interactions with food?
There are no known interactions with foods.

What dose is used?
An extract of maitake mushroom has most often been used by adults in a dose of 1-1.5 grams by mouth daily for up to 2 years. There isn’t enough reliable information to know what an appropriate dose of maitake mushroom in other forms might be. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult a healthcare professional before using.

By what other names is the product known?
Champignon Dansant, Champignon des Fous Dansants, Champignon Maitake, Dancing Mushroom, Grifola, Grifola frondosa, Hen of the Woods, Hongo Maitake, King of Mushrooms, Maitake, Monkey’s Bench, Mushroom, Ram’s Head, Roi des Champignons, Sheep’s Head, Shelf Fungi.

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