Maitake Mushroom

Print

What is it?

Maitake is a type of mushroom. People use it to make medicine.

Some people take maitake mushroom by mouth for infertility due to a hormonal disorder that causes enlarged ovaries with cysts (polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS), diabetes, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these uses.

It is effective?
Natural Medicines rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate.

Insufficient Evidence to Make a Determination for …

  • A hormonal disorder that causes enlarged ovaries with cysts (polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS). Early research shows that taking a specific dietary supplement containing maitake mushroom extract can improve ovulation in women whose periods have stopped due to PCOS. Maitake mushroom does not appear to be as effective as the drug clomiphene for PCOS, but the combination of these two agents may be more effective than either one alone for improving ovulation.
  • A group of cancers in which the body can’t make enough healthy blood cells (myelodysplastic syndromes).
  • Cancer.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS).
  • Diabetes.
  • Hay fever.
  • High blood pressure.
  • High levels of cholesterol or other fats (lipids) in the blood (hyperlipidemia).
  • HIV/AIDS.
  • Obesity.
  • Swelling (inflammation) of the liver (hepatitis).
  • Other conditions.

More evidence is needed to rate maitake mushroom for these uses.

How does it work?
Maitake mushroom contains chemicals which might help fight tumors, stimulate the immune system, and lower blood sugar and lipid levels.

Is there concern for the safety of its use?
When taken by mouth: Maitake mushroom is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth as medicine, but there isn’t much information about the potential side effects. Some people have reported nausea after taking maitake mushroom.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There isn’t enough reliable information to know if maitake mushroom is safe to use when pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Surgery: Maitake mushroom might affect blood sugar levels, making blood sugar control difficult during and after surgery. Stop using maitake mushroom at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Are there any drug interactions?

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)

Interaction Rating=Moderate Be cautious with this combination.

Maitake mushroom might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking maitake mushroom along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Are there any interactions with herbs and supplements?
Herbs and supplements that might lower blood pressure: Maitake mushroom might lower blood pressure. Using it along with other herbs and supplements that might lower blood pressure might cause your blood pressure to go too low. Some other herbs that might lower blood pressure include andrographis, casein peptides, cat’s claw, coenzyme Q-10, fish oil, L-arginine, lycium, stinging nettle, theanine, and others.
Herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar: Maitake mushroom might lower blood sugar levels. Using it along with other herbs or supplements that might also lower blood sugar could cause your blood sugar to drop too low. Some of these products include alpha-lipoic acid, bitter melon, chromium, devil’s claw, fenugreek, garlic, guar gum, horse chestnut seed, Panax ginseng, psyllium, Siberian ginseng, and others.

Are there any interactions with food?
There are no known interactions with foods.

What dose is used?
The appropriate dose of maitake mushroom depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for maitake mushroom. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

By what other names is the product known?
Champignon Dansant, Champignon des Fous Dansants, Champignon Maitake, Dancing Mushroom, Grifola, Grifola frondosa, Hen of the Woods, Hongo Maitake, King of Mushrooms, Maitake, Monkey’s Bench, Mushroom, Ram’s Head, Roi des Champignons, Sheep’s Head, Shelf Fungi.

Natural Medicines disclaims any responsibility related to medical consequences of using any medical product. Effort is made to ensure that the information contained in this monograph is accurate at the time it was published. Consumers and medical professionals who consult this monograph are cautioned that any medical or product related decision is the sole responsibility of the consumer and/or the health care professional. A legal License Agreement sets limitations on downloading, storing, or printing content from this Database. Except for any possible exceptions written into your License Agreement, no reproduction of this monograph or any content from this Database is permitted without written permission from the publisher. Unlawful to download, store, or distribute content from this site.

For the latest comprehensive data on this and every other natural medicine, health professionals should consult the Professional Version of the Natural Medicines. It is fully referenced and updated daily.

© Copyright 1995-2021. Therapeutic Research Faculty, publishers of Natural Medicines, Prescriber’s Letter, and Pharmacist’s Letter. All rights reserved.